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Scorpion Caresheets


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#1 The Nothing

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Posted 19 June 2005 - 11:16 AM

Hadrurus spp (Desert Hairy)

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Hadrurus arizonensis


These are one of the best beginner scorpions to keep. They are very hardy and reach a decent size of 4-5 inches. These are native of the deserts in the Southwestern USA and Mexico. In the wild they construct deep burrows. Some older adults have been found as deep as 12 ft in rodent burrows. They have long lives...up to 20 years or more. They are one of the harder species to breed in captivity. There has been speculation that the precise humidity that is in their burrows is hard to reproduce in captivity making babies die.

Housing
They can be kept in kritter keepers, sterilite boxes or aquariums.

Substrate
Substrate can be sand, dry peat or potting soil that is free of fertilizers. If you plan to let the scorpion burrow it is recommended that 6-8 inches is used. You will also want to dampen the substrate then let it dry out completely before adding the scorp. Also, Bentonite can be added as this helps keep burrows from collapsing.
Many keepers (myself included) use around 3-4 inches of substrate and provide a hiding place. Thus not letting them burrow.

FEEDING
Crickets, roaches and other insects. Like many scorps they have a tendancy to gourge then go on long fasts. I feed mine either 2 small or 1 large cricket a week in order to keep it active.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
Being a desert species, a dry enclosure is the best. Provide a water dish and that will be all they need. Keep the temperatures between 70-85F.

VENOM TOXICITY
On a scale from 1-5 they would be around 2. They have a fairly mild sting.



Centruroides gracilis (Slenderbrown Bark Scorpion)
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This scorpion is found in Florida, Central America and several islands in the Caribean. These are good climbers and are often found in tree bark and hollow trees. This is a communal species so small groups can be kept together as long as they are well fed.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the usual kritter keepers, sterlite boxes etc. Many keepers use tall tanks and lean cork bark against the sides for climbing. Be sure to use a good fitting top on the enclosure for these.

SUBSTRATE
Peat moss and/or potting soil about an inch or 2 deep is all that is needed since this species doesn't burrow.

FEEDING
Crickets,roaches or other small insects

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
70-85F is fine. These scorps seem to do well in a slightly humid environment. Keep the subustrate slightly damp (not wet) and restrict the ventilation. I also let the water dish over flow some when I give mine water.

VENOM TOXICITY
The one found in Florida have mild venom (around 2) where as some from Cent America can be very toxic(around 4). Anytime you acquire one of these it is a good idea to ask where it came from. The ones from Florida are the best ones to get especially for a beginner.


Babycurus jacksoni (Rusty Thick Tail)
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These neat little scorpions come from Tanzinia and other parts of East Africa. They are a communual species so small groups can be kept together as long as they are well fed. They will attack large prey for their size which is 3-4 inches as adults. In the wild they can be found in tree bark and ground litter. They do not burrow but climb very well.They are very similar to the Centruroides spp of the New World.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the usual kritter keepers, aquariums etc. It is good to provide some verticle structure such as cork bark for them to climb.

SUBSTRATE
Peat moss and/or potting soil makes the best substrate. It is recommended that part of the substrate me moist and part be dry so they can choose the humidity they prefer. One can also let the water dish over flow some when watering.

FEEDING
The usual crickets, roaches etc. are fine for this scorpion. Don't let their size fool you. I have had them kill and eat crickets larger than they are.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
Temps from 75-85 F are fine. This species in the wild experiences a very dry season and a wet season. Therefore some keep these as humid as Emperors while some keep them rather dry. As mentioned aboved, I like to give them a variety with a dry and a moist side and they appear to be doing well. Remember that it is a good idea to slightly increase humidity for any scorp when they are preparing to molt.

VENOM TOXICITY
Some places list these as medically significant while others do not. I am guessing they would be around a 2 on the scale. They might pack a wallop so it would be wise to not get stung by them (or any scorp for that matter)


Pandinus spp (Emperor Scorpion) and Heterometrus spp (Asian Forest Scorpion)

This will work for any of the Pandinus or Heterometrus species.
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Pandinus imperator

There are many ways to do this but this is my prefered way. First of all Emperors are a tropical scorp from West Africa therefore they prefer hot and humid conditions. I keep mine at around 80F but some keepers have theirs at 90F.
To start, pour 1-2 inches of gravel in the bottom of the tank. A large kritter keeper or 10 gal aquarium will house 1 scorpion. Pour 4-8 inches of peat, potting soil or mixture of both on the gravel. Then insert a 1/2-1 inch diameter pvc pipe in the corner of tank to the gravel layer.. This is for pouring water into the graval layer which leeches up through the substrate giving the humidity the scorpion needs. Also provide a water dish and a hiding place. When the substrate dries pour some water down the tube again. This method works far better than misting all the time. If your room temp is cool you can stick a reptile heater on the SIDE of the tank which will usually warm tank about 5-7 more degrees. The one I use is a Zoo med.

FEEDING
Emperors will eat crickets,roaches and sometimes mealworms and superworms. They can and will go long periods of time without feeding so don't worry if the scorpion doesn't eat much at first. When they are plump they may go months without feeding. Mine will usually go from one extreme to the other. Gourging on everything they can get for awhile and then not feeding hardly at all for a month or two.



Androctonus spp (Fat Tail Scorpions)

This Genus has some of the most dangerous scorpions in the world.
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Androctonus amoreuxi

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Androctonus bicolor

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Androctonus australis

These scorpions are found from N Africa to the Middle East and into Pakistan and Western India. A australis is attributed to killing more people than any scorpion in the world. They are fast and will readily sting. These are for experienced hobbyists. In saying this, like all scorpions they can't climb glass or plastic so are easy to manage. If you decide to keep these exercise extreme caution. They are my personal favorites to keep but I try to always be cautious

HOUSING
They can be kept in the usual kritter keepers, plastic boxes, aquariums etc. Whatever you decide to use be sure it is secure. It wouldn't be good to have one running loose in the house. Check out the Scorpion Enclosures Thread for some pictures.

SUBSTRATE
These are all oppurtunistic burrowers from desert environments. From 1-3 inches of sand or dry peat with a hide and a small water dish will be fine.

FEEDING
Crickets and other insects will be readily taken by these. They always sting their prey so feeding time is always exciting to watch.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
They do well in a dry environment with 70-85F TEMPS. I water mine about once every 2 weeks and lightly mist the substrate about once a month.

VENOM TOXICITY
These are very dangerously venomous!!! Be very careful when working with these.
A australis is the hottest at (5). The others are at least a (4).



Leiurus quinquestriatus (Deathstalker)
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This scorpion is said to have the most toxic venom of any known scorpion. They are native to the deserts of N Africa and the Middle East. This is another scorpion for the advanced keeper. Be very careful with these.

HOUSING
The usual kritter keepers, small aquariums or plastic boxes. Provide stacked rocks or half log for a hide.Make sure the enclosure is secure. Like all scorpions they can't climb glass or plastic.

SUBSTRATE
Dry peat moss or sand

FEEDING
Crickets and other small insects

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This is a typical desert species that does well in a dry environment. Temps should be 70-85F. Provide a small water dish about every 2 weeks and mist the substrate about once a month. If the scorpion appears like a molt is approach, more frequent mistings would be good.

VENOM TOXICITY
(5) Very dangerously venomous!!! Exercise caution when keeping these.[/quote]



Smeringurus mesaensis (Dune Scorpion)
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This scorpion is found in sandy dune areas of Western Arizona and the Mohave Desert of Califoria (not as common as one might think). They are commonly "harvested" and used as gifts such as belt buckles and paper weights. This species is next to impossible to breed in captivity (it has yet to be done) and is extremely fast. They seem to teleport from place to place. Despite its speed, it makes a good beginner scorpion as it tends to flee rather than attack

HOUSING
Adults should have a large critter keeper or small 5.5g fish tank. This species prefers and extremely dry environment with plenty of running room.

SUBSTRATE
Sand only

FEEDING
crickets (in wild, native areas 90% of an adult Smeringurus mesaensis' diet is younger S. mesaensis)

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This species is found in some of the driest, hottest areas of the US. Daytime temperaturs should be at least 80+F. Because of their native environment, night time temps can greatly vary from daytime temps, but should keep them over 60F. Smeringurus mesaensis does not appreciate humidity and water. There is little need to keep a waterdish, make sure you're crickets are well fed and hydrated and the S. mesaensis will be fine.

VENOM TOXICITY
Smeringurus mesaensis, while very fast, packs a fairly mild sting. On a scale from 1-5 they will rank in around 2.

#2 Guest_LongDucDong_*

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Posted 21 June 2005 - 10:05 AM

Very nicely done Brian! Very informative!

#3 BrianS

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Posted 02 July 2005 - 11:27 AM

Parabuthus spp (Thick Tail Scorpions)
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Parabuthus leisoma

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Parabuthus transvaalicus

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Parabuthus mossembicensis

These are from Southern to Eastern Africa and parts of the Middle East. They closely resemble Androctonus. At least 2 species (P tranvaalicus & P mossembicensis) are capable of spraying venom.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the typical deli cups, kritter keepers, sterlite boxes etc.

SUBSTRATE
Dry peat, sand or a mixture of both makes fine substrate. It does not not have to be very deep as these typically only make scrapes under rocks, or other ground debri.

FEEDING
The usual crickets, roaches and other insects.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
These scorpions are from the deserts and savannahs of Africa so temps from 75F to 85F will work very well. Keep the humidity low but always provide a water dish especially for gravid females.

VENOM TOXICITY
These have potent venom of a (3). They are capable of producing large quantity of venom so therefore are considered a potentially dangerous species. Be careful if you decide to keep these.

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Posted 03 July 2005 - 10:07 AM

Mesobuthus gibbosus anatolicus
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Mesobuthus gibbosus gibbosus
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M. gibbosus anatolicus live on Cypres.
M. gibbosus gibbosus live Greece and Turkey but not in the Nord off Turkey.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the kritter keepers, sterlite boxes etc.
Semi-communual

SUBSTRATE
Arid/semi-arid habitats with little vegetation. . Don't dig burrows, but use natural burrows under stones and other objects.

FEEDING
The usual crickets, roaches and other insects.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
Moderate to limited humidity (30-40%). In the summer 24 - 35 Celsius. Winter between 10 - 20 Celsius

VENOM TOXICITY
These have potent venom of a (2+). And are very fast when they sting

#5 Guest_wikkid_devil_*

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 06:49 AM

Scorpio maurus palmatus


I keep them in a 10 gallon (U.K.) tank with a high ventilation mesh top.

According to the hygrometer the ambient humidity is aroun 55%

The substrate is a mix of play sand and used P.imp substrate (a mixture of bark chipping, potting compost and shredded sphagnum moss) with some fine and pea sized gravel mixed in (75% 20% 3% 2% approx by volume)

Below this is a half inch layer of pea gravel. The gravel is a moisture reservoir with just enough moisture to cause condensaion between the stones. I add 100ml of water once a month via a tube into the centre of the gravel reservoir.

They have a weter dish wich is topped up daily. The dish is porous to a degree, so the sand in that corner is permanently visibly damp but not wet to the touch.

There is a heat mat on on of the shor sides, supplemented by a 40 watt red lamp from above. The ambient teperature is 80f.

The substrate has a generous amount of cover supplies by cobbles, slate and thin bark pieces.

I always make sure that I can see at least 6 small crickets in the tank. So far I have had no further canibalisation problems.

The first to moult has a burrow directly under the water dish. The second is in a scrap under a piece of slat approx 10cm from the heat mat edge.

The third is yet to moult.

Hope this helps

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#6 Guest_Tityus_*

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Posted 28 July 2005 - 12:47 PM

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Tityus stigmurus confluenciata form (Tityus serrulatus)

This scorpion 5 - 6,5 cm / 2 - 2,5 inch long are from Southern America "Brazil" Pectines : 18 - 25 teeth is Parthenogenesis and very communal.


Housing
When u used a box of 30L x 20W x 15 H cm / 12L x 8W x 6H inch is good for 3 scorps. The like a peace of bark as hiding place.


Substrate
Humus mixed with vermiculite

Feeding
Crickets, roaches and other insects.

Temperature and Humidity
Keep them between 25-32 C / 77-90 F and 70-80 %

Venom Toxicity
On a scale from 1-5 they would be 5 and higher. Be careful when these species sting, you have a high risk on anaphylactic shock and there is a special Antivenom from Instituto Butantan for this specie.

Edited by Tityus, 03 January 2007 - 05:51 AM.


#7 The Nothing

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 08:13 PM

Centruroides exilicauda (Arizona Bark Scorpion)

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C. exilicauda is found through most of the southwest United States: Arizona, Nevada, California and New Mexico. Like most Centruroides scorpions, they love verticle climbing areas and are easily sexed by lenth of the metasoma.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the kritter keepers, aquariums etc. It is important to have verticle climbing structures (branches, bark, etc) as this species will spend 90% of its time off the ground.

SUBSTRATE
With the amount of time this species spends above the ground, the substrate is not of a big concern. Peat, sand, gravel all work just fine. It is more important to keep the substrate dry than what you use.

FEEDING
as most scorpions, C. exilicauda like crickets, cockroaches, and other small invertabrates.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This is a typical desert species that does well in a dry environment. Temps should be 70-85F. Provide a small water dish about every 2 weeks. Scorplings should be kept with slightly higher humidity by misting to help aid in molting.

VENOM TOXICITY
Centruroides exilicauda is the most venomous scorpion found in the United States. No deaths from this scorpion has occured since the creation of an antivenom. On the scale of 1-5, this scorpion will rank in at a 3-4.

#8 The Nothing

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Posted 30 July 2005 - 08:20 PM

Centruroides hentzi (Florida Bark Scorpion)

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C. hentzi is found in the southeastern United States: mostly Florida and boarding states. Like most Centruroides scorpions, they love verticle climbing areas and are easily sexed by lenth of the metasoma.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the kritter keepers, aquariums etc. It is important to have verticle climbing structures (branches, bark, etc) where this species will spend much of its time

SUBSTRATE
slightly damp Peat, coconut peat, potting soils, etc.

FEEDING
as most scorpions crickets, cockroaches, and other small invertabrates are great prey items.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This is a typical sub-tropical species that does well in a humid environment. Temps should be 70-85F and humidity between 70 and 80%. Their native area is home to many hurricanes and tropical storms that keep things fairly damp.

VENOM TOXICITY
Centruroides hentzi has painful yet not medically significant sting. It ranks in about a 2 on the scale of 1-5.

#9 Guest_LongDucDong_*

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 11:12 AM

I see most people have posted caresheets for hotter/harder-to-come-by scorpions. Time permitting I will try and post some caresheets for more "beginner type" scorpions.


Scientific name: Hadogenes troglodytes
Common name: African flat rock scorpion

Males have extended metasoma (tails) and females have short metasoma. The one pictured below is my adult male. These are also the longest scorpions on earth as some have measured almost 9" from chelicerae to end of metasoma! They are great beginner scorps as they are hardy, long lived, large, rather docile and have extremely low venom toxicity.

CAPTIVE CARE:

Temperature: I keep mine perfectly between 75-85 degrees.

Humidity: Low. Mine hovers around 55%. I up the humidity to around 65% when its time for them to molt. This might help aid in a successful molt.

Water: No misting is required for this specie, however make sure a water dish of decent size is available for the scorpion to drink out of.

Diet: I feed mine gut-loaded crickets and nothing else. They do perfectly fine on this diet.

Substrate: I keep mine on a 80-20% mix of peat moss (make sure no fertilizer is in the peat moss) and fine sand. Put more emphasis on the peat moss.

Housing: Small scorplings can be kept in decent sized deli-cups with the above mentioned substrate. Larger adults can be kept in a 10 gallon tank. Make sure there are plenty of stacked rocks for them to hide in. I use slate that is stacked very securely to give the scorpion plenty of hide options.

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 11:56 PM

Posted Image

Tityus stigmurus confluenciata form (Tityus serrulatus)

This scorpion 5 ? 6,5 cm / 2 ? 2,5 inch long are from Southern America ?Brazil? Pectines : 18 - 25 teeth is Parthenogenesis and very communal.


Housing
When u used a box of 30L x 20W x 15 H cm / 12L x 8W x 6H inch is good for 3 scorps. The like a peace of bark as hiding place.


Substrate
Humus mixed with vermiculite

Feeding
Crickets, roaches and other insects.


Temperature and Humidity
Keep them between 25-32 C / 77-90 F and 70-80 %

Venom Toxicity
On a scale from 1-5 they would be 5 and higher. Be careful when these species sting, you have a high risk on anaphylactic shock and there is a special Antivenom from Instituto Butantan for this specie.


I personally feel that it should be housed the same way a dart frog is. a tinc in fact lives in the same area, right next to that plant there both live happy. i'll write this one later.
a substrate of vermiculite will look ugly. a well planted tropical vivarium with some felled wood will be good.

Posted Image
something like this but smaller of course.

#11 BrianS

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 08:20 AM

Most people with many many scorpions (myself included) dont have the space for the elaborate enclosures. However, you are correct in that the pic you posted would most certainly be a Tityus townhouse for sure :)

#12 vardoulas

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Posted 24 January 2006 - 04:11 AM

I personally feel that it should be housed the same way a dart frog is. a tinc in fact lives in the same area, right next to that plant there both live happy. i'll write this one later.
a substrate of vermiculite will look ugly. a well planted tropical vivarium with some felled wood will be good.



T.serrulatus can be found in cemetaries and inside houses in Brazil so not too fancy terrariums are realy needed, unless ofcourse its for your own pleasure.

and as Brian said if you have lots of scorpions big and fancy terrariums are taking too much precious space

#13 Guest_Tityus_*

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Posted 26 January 2006 - 05:47 PM

I also think it's a little bit dangerous when I make a nice vivarium with many tropical plants and 10 or 15 Tityus serrulatus free in it. You never no where this little sweethearts will hiding hisself and when you must clean your vivarium you have a big risk to be stung.

#14 redknee

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 10:38 AM

Centruroides hentzi (Florida Bark Scorpion)

Posted Image

C. hentzi is found in the southeastern United States: mostly Florida and boarding states. Like most Centruroides scorpions, they love verticle climbing areas and are easily sexed by lenth of the metasoma.

HOUSING
They can be kept in the kritter keepers, aquariums etc. It is important to have verticle climbing structures (branches, bark, etc) where this species will spend much of its time

SUBSTRATE
slightly damp Peat, coconut peat, potting soils, etc.

FEEDING
as most scorpions crickets, cockroaches, and other small invertabrates are great prey items.

TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY
This is a typical sub-tropical species that does well in a humid environment. Temps should be 70-85F and humidity between 70 and 80%. Their native area is home to many hurricanes and tropical storms that keep things fairly damp.

VENOM TOXICITY
Centruroides hentzi has painful yet not medically significant sting. It ranks in about a 2 on the scale of 1-5.





I get these guys here and they are easy to care for, I had been stung by them a few times, i was careless at the time due to the fact i didn't know too much about scorpions, I didn't get no reaction from the sting at all, didn't even get sick.

This thread rocks :P :)

Edited by redknee, 28 January 2006 - 10:41 AM.


#15 redknee

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Posted 05 July 2006 - 05:12 PM

still is an awesome thread

#16 Guest_barkscorpions_*

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Posted 05 September 2006 - 05:58 PM

All ya guys posted some great care sheets. Thanks!

Luc

#17 Guest_dGr8-1_*

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Posted 07 September 2006 - 12:24 AM

I recently orderd a bunch of hot scorps.
These caresheets will definitely help a lot.

#18 Guest_Simpleng_Garapal_*

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 04:23 AM

Hi,

This thread is very helpful. I would just like to ask if A. Australis is communal as well? Also, if someone could post about hottentotta spp, that would be of great help! Thanks!

#19 BrianS

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Posted 17 September 2006 - 01:17 PM

Hi,

This thread is very helpful. I would just like to ask if A. Australis is communal as well?

They can be kept together as adults only. I would watch them very closely and keep well fed. I have kept them together with no problems but it can always be a little risky


Also, if someone could post about hottentotta spp, that would be of great help! Thanks!

Keep the same way as Androctonus and Parabuthus. Hot and dry :rockon:

#20 Guest_Simpleng_Garapal_*

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Posted 18 September 2006 - 06:18 AM


Hi,

This thread is very helpful. I would just like to ask if A. Australis is communal as well?

They can be kept together as adults only. I would watch them very closely and keep well fed. I have kept them together with no problems but it can always be a little risky


Also, if someone could post about hottentotta spp, that would be of great help! Thanks!

Keep the same way as Androctonus and Parabuthus. Hot and dry ;)



Thanks Brian!




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