Guest furryscaly

nudibranchs (sea slugs)

23 posts in this topic

I've always thought they looked really cool, and I've decided that some day I'd like to try collecting them. I currently know very little about nudibranchs though. Does anyone have any or have info on them? Are there a lot of species available in captivity? Do they even do well in a tank? Can they be kept communally, and can species be mixed? What do you feed them? How long do they usually live, and how much do they usually cost? Can you keep them in with sea stars, anenomes, etc? Are all species venomous, and how powerful is the venom? What's with the fanlike "tail"? I used to know more than I do now, but I forget.

Edited by furryscaly

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I would tell you save your money. It's what we call in the trade a 3 month(max) pet. They do not do well at all in aquarums what so ever. Also all the collerfull one's carry a very strong venom and when they die the venom will be released into the water and will kill everything you have in the tank. My sugestion to you is to look for something else. There more hassle then what there worth and it would be beter to use the money for something else.

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Poo. Well that just sucks. What about them makes them so unsuited to aquarium life? Also, just 'cause I like to learn, what do they eat? I may not get any after all, but I'd still like to know more about them.

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What they eat can't be found in a aquarum only in the ocean. There for unfortionaly it won't work

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Yeah, but what is it that they eat? I'm just curious. I know very little about these interesting creatures. I haven't the room or the time to maintain an aquarium right now anyway, and if they do so poorly in captivity then I don't really want any.

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they eat plant mater like slug's on land. and it's next inposs to get the plant's yet even more inposs to keep them alive in a aquarum

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when I was keeping my reef I had a baby lettuce nudibrach, and he lived the whole time I had him.. about 8 months before I took the tank down when I had to move out of the apartment I had. But I also had a bit of an algae problem which I think was the slugs food source.. If I were to set up another tank any time soon I wouldn't have any though.

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WoW!!!

 

So they release all the (venom?) or poision into the water!!!

 

Thats very cool!!!

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In college my Biology proffesor ws a nudiranch specialist when he worked for an Aquarium in California I think in San Francisco.He spouted off about them every chance he got .They are very beautiful but have special dietary needs of whatever algea occurs where they are native.That was a few years back and I was drunk the majority of the time so I did not retain much of what he said about the sea slugs although I got a B in the class.

On a side note I went to SanDiego Camp Penalton on business with my dad a few years back and found the most beautiful sea cucumber I have ever seen it was white with leopard spots.Sea cucumbers are usually mud and algae colored so this was a fantastic find.

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sea cucumbers are different from nudibranchs, but have a similar problem adapting to captive life and also secrete venom into their surroundings when they die.

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sea cucumbers are different from nudibranchs, but have a similar problem adapting to captive life and also secrete venom into their surroundings when they die.

Plus they bury themselves in the mud/sand and regurgitate there innards :D:blink::rockon:

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exactly, it's not only venomous but it's also just gross to clean up

 

the most beautiful/fascinating creatures seem to be the most difficult if not impossible to keep in captivity,I am talking across the board of all animals. it is a shame. :rockon: That sea cucumber was very beautiful.What about seahorses/dragons are they difficult/impossible to keep alive ?

Edited by Scott-Land

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seahorses are easy to keep alive if they're kept properly in the right size tank with the right current with the proper decor, and a good supply of live brine shrimp. You can't just toss a seahorse in an established tank and expect it to live more than a few hours, but if you set up a tank to cater specifically to seahorses then they'd be very long lived and happy.

 

the only tricky part is getting them to eat, they often require live brine shrimp as a dietary staple, which you would need to hatch and raise. There are very few species that are "difficult" to keep, I don't think keeping aquariums requires talent so much as investment, but the cost in both time and money can escalate much faster than you'd think.

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seahorses are easy to keep alive if they're kept properly in the right size tank with the right current with the proper decor, and a good supply of live brine shrimp. You can't just toss a seahorse in an established tank and expect it to live more than a few hours, but if you set up a tank to cater specifically to seahorses then they'd be very long lived and happy.

 

the only tricky part is getting them to eat, they often require live brine shrimp as a dietary staple, which you would need to hatch and raise. There are very few species that are "difficult" to keep, I don't think keeping aquariums requires talent so much as investment, but the cost in both time and money can escalate much faster than you'd think.

Thanks ! I always thought seahorses were impossible to keep alive very long.

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check out www.seahorse.org if you're curious about seahorses, they're the premiere source for the husbandry of captive seahorses, they're very cool critters and if you ask me or justin we'd be happy to help anyone through the process of setting up a tank for a couple of them.

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check out www.seahorse.org if you're curious about seahorses, they're the premiere source for the husbandry of captive seahorses, they're very cool critters and if you ask me or justin we'd be happy to help anyone through the process of setting up a tank for a couple of them.

Thanks I will check it out :lol: Do you have any seahorses? and pictures :D

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I actually have never kept a seahorse tank of my own, I worked with them at work on a very regular basis though, and walked several people through setting up tanks for them.

 

I don't have any pics of my own but the seahorse.org galleries have hundreds of great shots of exotic species most of which aren't available in the trade.

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I actually have never kept a seahorse tank of my own, I worked with them at work on a very regular basis though, and walked several people through setting up tanks for them.

 

I don't have any pics of my own but the seahorse.org galleries have hundreds of great shots of exotic species most of which aren't available in the trade.

I looked at the site and it was Great! Thanks! One day if I get over my ills I will get some of these I have always been interested in these eversense I snagged one on a fishing line when I was a boy in NJ.The seahorse was attached by its tail to seaweed which ws attached to the hook the seahorse was unaffected we just let it go but I have always wanted to keep these but thought they were difficult to keep alive.

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they eat plant mater like slug's on land. and it's next inposs to get the plant's yet even more inposs to keep them alive in a aquarum

 

What they eat can't be found in a aquarum only in the ocean. There for unfortionaly it won't work

 

 

Not true at all that information is false on both counts.Most eat sponges,anemones,corallimorphians,zooanthids,bryozoans,crustaceans none of which is strictly plant matter,and other nudibranchs.Very few species eat algae or plant matter if they all ate that they would be extremely easy to keep as algae of all types and Penicillus, Halimeda,Chaetomorpha,Udotea,Caulerpa etc. are readily available and extremely easy to proliferate in a tank.Theres even one species of nudibranch that has symbiotic algae so it only needs light and algae to survive.

 

The gentleman who had one for 8 months in a reef is average for a knowledgable keeper if he hadnt moved, it probably would have been longer, shows he took care of his reef. A mixed reef soft,hard,mushrooms,gorgonians,sponges,live rock is best,or if you just want them go specialty, just them and thier food source.If they die in 2 or 3 months they were either damaged in collection,or have no food source,are old,parasitized or bad water quality they cant take nasty water,treat them as you would coral or seaorses on water quality.It takes a day or two being dead to foul just like a anemone,coral etc.Heres a list of nudi's i've kept successfully and bred and thier food source may it help you to keep the nudibranch you have wanted.Best specific gravity(salinity) 1022-1025 temp mid 70's.

 

Nudibranch- Food source

 

Berghia verrucicornis - Aiptasia anemone which spread easily.

 

Hermissenda crassicornis - Pachycerianthus finbriatus(burrowing anemone)

 

Dedronotus frondosus- Tubularia hydroid (extremely common)

 

Tethys fimbria - any small crustaceans(small shrimp,amphipods,etc.)

 

Casella atromarginata - any spiculose sponge sp.

 

Goniodoris nodosa - sea squirts (extremely common)

 

Hypselodoris tricolor- encrusting sponges(extremely common)

 

Chromodoris loringi- encrusting sponges

 

Diaululu sandiegensis- any sponge type a variety is best(extremely common)

 

Triopha carpenteri - encrusting orange sponge(extremely commmon)

 

Thecacera pennigera- bryozoan Bugula plumosa(common)

 

Tridachia crispata(lettuce nudibranch)-( green algae)

 

I have sucessfully kept all of these,and thier food sources grow readily in the aquarium if you setup right.

Edited by P.Duplente

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Thanks ! I always thought seahorses were impossible to keep alive very long.

 

I've ordered marine inverts from just about every reputable source there is,these guys while pricey provide the best on the net in seahorses.They offer cb seahorses numerous rare species including Hippocampus ingens which can hit 10 inches or more and they eat frozen.But you should follow the other members advice a dedicated tank properly setup for them is best.Good luck

 

http://seahorse.com/shop/index.php?main_pa...5425fb568bd8c28

Edited by P.Duplente

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Nudibranchs Rule!!! Hello P. Duplente, any photos you could share of the nudibranchs you maintained and their tanks???

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me and my friends have been wanting to go on a deep sea fishing charter for a while and im just wanting to know some of the good charters around here that wont break the bank. thanks

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