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lxdng79

Liocheles australasiae – the Dwarf Wood Scorpion

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Breeding and Raising Liocheles australasiae – the Dwarf Wood Scorpion

 

Firstly, a million Thanks to guys for considering this article for a special SOTM. This so totally unexpected so thank you giving me this opportunity. I must first state that all this stems primarily from my own personal experience so forgive me for not being able to provide proper citation for much of the general info.

Liocheles australasiae – the Dwarf Wood Scorpion

2 subspecies: Liocheles australasiae australasiae; Liocheles australasiae borneoensis

Family: Liochelidae (Hemiiscorpiidae/Ischruridae)

 

Distribution: The distributive range of this miniature scorpion species is wide and disparate. Isolated populations have been encountered on the islands of Japan, Hawai, Northern Australia and all over South East Asia.

 

Habitat: This species is typically encountered inhabiting narrow crevices under the bark of certain trees, but their flattened bodies enable them to take residences in virtually any narrow crack or crevice whether natural or man-made such as brick piles. These specimens have been extracted from separate populations residing in 4 different sites:

1. a tree in an urban residence within the capital city centre of Kuala Lumper

2. a tree in higland area just outside Kuala Lumpur

3. an old chicken shed in a country house in Sri Aman - Sarawak, East Malaysia on the island of Borneo

4. and a brick pile in a human residence in the middle of a city green lung in Kuching City also Sarawak, East Malaysia.

Specimens taken from Borneo are believed to be representatives of the sub-species borneoensis

 

lioborneoa.jpg

 

 

I'm sure quite a few of you out there have occasionally come across some of these. They are virtually non-existent in the Malaysian pet trade since they are ommonly encountered virtually anywhere in Malaysia, from suburban niches to primary rainforests. Like some scorpion species, these are parthenogenic and easy to breed as many of you may have experienced.

 

gravido4.jpg

 

The one common dilemma commonly expressed is "how to feed scorplings of such small size?" especially when pinheads are not easily attainable. Other inquiries include the ideal captive conditions to encourage the development of embryos and consequentially partuition. This is all based on my personal experience consisting mainly of trial and error experiments so I won't pretend to be any kind of expert.

 

Optimal breeding setups

My first attempts were communal setups that emulated their natural habitat as best I could; narrow bark crevices in trees where I collected them in huge numbers. The barks were placed vertical as shown in earlier posts. 3 of the 6 adults I collected, gave birth not long after settling in but after 2 initial births, which yielded around 40 over slings in total, all reproduction ceased for an extended period of time; approximately 6 months. Additionally, incidents of cannibalism prompted me to try something different.

buisness.jpg

After trying cotton bud dispensers, which were more aesthetically driven than anything else, one of my adults popped in a temporary holding case fashioned from a business-card dispenser. This housing proved most conducive to prolific parthenogenesis. I think it has something to do with isolation as they seem more likely to breed in the absence of bothersome tankmates as their territorial natures would imply. It would seem that though often encountered living arboreally in vertical crevices, partuition seems to go better horizontally. The embryos are clearly visible underneath the tergites of this gravid individual.

ripen1.jpg

Once effectively isolated, gravid individuals are quick to birth. During this process, it is advisable to not disturb the mother by moving her enclosure, as they are quite sensitive and it may even halt the process mid way resulting in fewer offspring.

pop.jpg

After realizing this one was birthing, I tucked her away and left her for a few days.

Brooded.jpg

They may have broods of up to 40 babies at a time. Its ok to feed one mealworm at a time as the mothers will need to replenish the expended energy and thus will not feel compelled to consume her own young.

Lab2icls.jpg

The young are quick to wean at 2i and stay nearby until as late as 4i or even 5i, so it is not necessary to move them any time soon.

Lab2i1.jpg

Young broods are not cannibalistic until about 4i or 5i. Prior to this they may even work together to subdue larger prey like a small mealworm.

woodnymphs.jpg

You may encourage the scorplings to take mealworms by chopping one up into small bits. Gently lift the bark piece under which they hide, sprinkle the mealworms bits on the ground where the bark should be and then place back the hide so that the scorplings on the bark's underside meets with the mealworm bits on the coco-peat surface.

Babyeats1.jpg

Don't stress too much as they are unlikely to be crushed providing you replace the bark gently. They will no doubt taste the mealworms hemolymph stimulating them to feed. After a couple of times the scorplings will readily mob tossed-in mealies as the wriggle pass a line of tiny chela.

Babyeats6.jpg

 

Raising scorplings

clump1.jpg

Though not particularly communal, scorplings are not inclined to cannibalism below 5i providing you give them enough food.

fullhouse.jpg

They will gladly clump together even with members that are not immediate siblings.

 

Individual Housing

Lauscolony.jpg

At some point, in the interest of monitoring growth rates and minimizing the event of occasional cannibalism, Individual housing is eventually the most ideal option. Feeding them however may take more of your time.

combounit.jpg

My sub-adults are raised in this multi-compartment storage case available at most hardware stores. I'm looking for one with taller walls and a clearer view.

dresser.jpg

Adults of breeding age are placed in these individual business card jewel boxes and stored in two mini-drawer compartments that I purchased for messing around with.

 

Currently, my 1st batch of scorplings have reached adulthood and are pending transfer to their own apartments where we will see if they will produce the 1st gen of purely captive bred specimens.

Lioadltcls9.jpg

Phew, until next posts. Feel welcome to post comments and suggestions here, even pics of your own setups and colonies. I'm always eager to see someone else's take on keeping these pocket-sized scorps. I'm considering having one on my office table in a small receptacle just to see if my colleagues will even notice it.

Lioadltcls7.jpg

 

I hesitate to call myself an expert but I can push these little guys around with sufficient confidence. :P

Babyeats6.jpg

 

And just to add to that, for transferring tiny scorplings , my tools of choice are: - a spoon, a little brush and a strip of rough-sided paper for them to cling on.

tools.jpg

I think the choice of tools determine the method lol

temporary7.jpg

 

Temporary Housing While I anticipated setting them up in these: -

temporary2.jpg

temporary6.jpg

I held them temporarily in these: - two deli cups stuffed with scrunched up damp paper towels.

temporary.jpg

This alternately makes basic, easy to manage housing for scorplings in the event that setup decisions take longer than expected lol

Lioslingcls4.jpg

 

Lioslingcls6.jpg

 

Lioslingcls13.jpg

Edited by lxdng79

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Thank you for posting that highly informative breeding an keeping report, lxdng79 :thmbup: Also the pictures are very usefull. I think we might consider this a special SOTM, so I'll make a link in the SOTM section.Do you agree, Peter?

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Thank you for posting that highly informative breeding an keeping report, lxdng79 :thmbup: Also the pictures are very usefull. I think we might consider this a special SOTM, so I'll make a link in the SOTM section.Do you agree, Peter?

 

I totally agree, Michiel! This article will be helpful for everyone who's interested in this species. Very well written and informative :thmbup:

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That's really a nice sotm. It's quite interesting to read about a species who's not so often in hobby.

Keep up your work! :rockon::rockon::rockon:

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Why Thanks guys, mighty kind of you to consider this for an SOTM :thyesssmileyf:considering I didn't cite anything outside my own experience . I just needed to make some minor corrections here to make it a little more worthy of an SOTM...00000404.gif I always looked up to the caliber of expertise here at Venom List so to receive this kind gesture from you guys, it means a lot. Thanks again. exactly.gif

 

"We are the Eater of Worlds... the Relentless Tides of Devastation Sweeping across the Stars.... We are the Ravaging Swarm"

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Beautifully written. No one could've done it better than the Sultan of Liocheles! Nice pictures too Alex.

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too bad I'm finish with my SOTM about Australisae and Waigiensis.. anyway great write up and very informative Ü

 

Cheers

Chest

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Dear Chest,

 

Pls don't let my L. aus post discourage you from posting one on both L. aus and L. waig... I for one have never even seen L. waig in real life. So I for one would like so see your post especially if its about comparing their behavior and natural history; one which is pertinent considering that they both are likely evolutionary branch-offs from each other to adapt to different environmental situations that have caused their deviation in size.

 

Looking forward to your upcoming L. aus vs L. waig post

 

Best regards LX

 

"We are the Eater of Worlds... the Relentless Tides of Devastation Sweeping across the Stars.... We are the Ravaging Swarm"

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Hi Chest,

 

Good thing that your SOTM is also finished! I hope to read it soon and remember, the more info, the merrier! So go ahead and post it, please.

 

Cheers, Michiel

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Hi Chest,

 

Good thing that your SOTM is also finished! I hope to read it soon and remember, the more info, the merrier! So go ahead and post it, please.

 

Cheers, Michiel

 

I changed my mind. I'll be posting a new SOTM about another species but not now I need to know more about them, Ill just post it by the time I finished the article.

 

LX

 

Like what I've said no problem and great article

 

Cheers

Chest

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hi, for now im trying to seperate the adult that just gave birth and raise them in a seperate enclosure so that if theres some scorps that will got pregnant when reach adult then its it liocheles aus...coz they are parthenogenic. today i discovered some of them that is givng birth but since they are place with the others they cant have peace releasing all scorps...pity on them :( and other also eat the little ones,,but i will seperate them now coz i just bought a plastic organizer container...yeah its true they always playing dead...thanks...

 

 

angela

 

p.s.- i try to post some new pics here..ty.

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Nice.... yes indeed isolation seems to stimulate embryo development and parturition for L. australasiae... worked for me at least. Power feeding them also kicks things into high gear... but with that many scorps you probably wouldn't want to put yourself through that kind of punishment... especially feeding each one individually...

 

Just curious how many do you have?

 

You could try this... all adults or large ones individually... then for the sub-adults, house them in groups of similar sizes... they are less likely to cannibalize when the battle of the bulge ends at stalemate but give them lot of places to hide... but not too large an enclosure because you want them to sense the prey item as soon as you chuck it in. Tough balancing act, I know....

 

As for what to feed them... normally they don't do crickets or mealworms. In the wild they inhabit trees infested with termites and snatch the occasional flying insect that perches on the trunk of the tree.

 

If you can get pinheads... then no problem... just let it rain down.... but I can't buy pinheads in Malaysia so I had to condition them to take mealworms by chopping them in half so that they chelicerae (mouth parts) comes in contact with the hemolymph (bug juice a.k.a. insect blood). This had to be done regularly for a while before they take live mealies... another thing that works are cricket legs...

 

All the best. You can cook it up into one huge self-consuming and replicating community which some of my buds have 'TRIED' to do... I've experimented with all sorts of wacky ways to house them.... now its your turn :rockon:

 

My friend had a crazy idea of housing a living one on the inside of a wristwatch :laughing13: Don't even wanna think how to make that work....

Edited by lxdng79

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Nice.... yes indeed isolation seems to stimulate embryo development and parturition for L. australasiae... worked for me at least. Power feeding them also kicks things into high gear... but with that many scorps you probably wouldn't want to put yourself through that kind of punishment... especially feeding each one individually...

 

Just curious how many do you have?

 

You could try this... all adults or large ones individually... then for the sub-adults, house them in groups of similar sizes... they are less likely to cannibalize when the battle of the bulge ends at stalemate but give them lot of places to hide... but not too large an enclosure because you want them to sense the prey item as soon as you chuck it in. Tough balancing act, I know....

 

As for what to feed them... normally they don't do crickets or mealworms. In the wild they inhabit trees infested with termites and snatch the occasional flying insect that perches on the trunk of the tree.

 

If you can get pinheads... then no problem... just let it rain down.... but I can't buy pinheads in Malaysia so I had to condition them to take mealworms by chopping them in half so that they chelicerae (mouth parts) comes in contact with the hemolymph (bug juice a.k.a. insect blood). This had to be done regularly for a while before they take live mealies... another thing that works are cricket legs...

 

All the best. You can cook it up into one huge self-consuming and replicating community which some of my buds have 'TRIED' to do... I've experimented with all sorts of wacky ways to house them.... now its your turn :rockon:

 

My friend had a crazy idea of housing a living one on the inside of a wristwatch :laughing13: Don't even wanna think how to make that work....

 

 

 

 

hi,..yeah as of now im really have a hard time feeding them..really!! :(:( ..i already seperated the adult ones...i dont know how long my patience will last..hahahaha...i think i have a more than 500 pcs..in all..maybe ill ask chest if he want some to adopt..hehehe for now im still enjoying them, im still continue my research about liocheles..kinda funny i never expected this coz im not fun of keeping like this kind of creatures...but maybe thru the influence of my husband i learned..he has also asian and emperor scorps,and other i dont know the names hehehe.. tarantula's, and the new member of the family "faylok" the bearded dragon..ok lxdng79...thanks for some advice.

 

Angela

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hi,..yeah as of now im really have a hard time feeding them..really!! :(:( ..i already seperated the adult ones...i dont know how long my patience will last..hahahaha...i think i have a more than 500 pcs..in all..maybe ill ask chest if he want some to adopt..hehehe for now im still enjoying them, im still continue my research about liocheles..kinda funny i never expected this coz im not fun of keeping like this kind of creatures...but maybe thru the influence of my husband i learned..he has also asian and emperor scorps,and other i dont know the names hehehe.. tarantula's, and the new member of the family "faylok" the bearded dragon..ok lxdng79...thanks for some advice.

 

Angela

 

wow!!! beside every great man there is an even greater woman :)....

Edited by lxdng79

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