Michiel

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Michiel last won the day on April 13 2016

Michiel had the most liked content!

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About Michiel

  • Rank
    Scorpion Nut
  • Birthday 06/28/1975

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    The Netherlands
  • Interests
    The Scorpions of South America, especially the Guyana's
  1. That is a nice haul, Jeroen!
  2. Hi Slingblade, Of the Rhopalurus species I've kept over the years, I found this one the most difficult to keep. Bringing up the young is not an easy task. For some reasons they don't eat very well, meaning they simply refuse appropriate sized crickets on a regular basis. Besides this, the young are very sensitive to drought. So, when you decide to buy young, they would need some TLC. Adults are not very difficult to keep....Adults are rather strong. This species inhabits rain forests and forest pockets in savannah type landscape, so instead of R.junceus, which is a true habitat generalist, it is a habitat specialist, thus no, you can't keep as R.junceus. If you have more questions please let me know.....although I do not frequent these boards very often But will drop in every now and then again from now on.... Ciao, Michiel
  3. I am pro "closed scorpion lab".....so no labels needed....
  4. Yes, it would be safe to do so..... Cheers, Michiel
  5. You can't see if this specimen is from Tunesia...In recent years some A.australis were imported from other countries like Lybia and Tunesia and for some reason they are labelled morphs... The Tunesia specimens are said to be bigger and more stocky than the ones from surrounding countries.. by the looks of it your specimen isn't that large. A.australis occurs in all north africa and i.e. Jordan....and there are some differences in populations like size and coloration....but in the end...they are all A.australis :-).... Just a tip.....remove those exuvia the minute you see them....organisms like mites are still in the exuvium after shedding and when you remove it...you get rid of them..instead of mites that are able to crawl back to the scorpion...
  6. You can't see if this specimen is from Tunesia...In recent years some A.australis were imported from other countries like Lybia and Tunesia and for some reason they are labelled morphs... The Tunesia specimens are said to be bigger and more stocky than the ones from surrounding countries.. by the looks of it your specimen isn't that large. A.australis occurs in all north africa and i.e. Jordan....and there are some differences in populations like size and coloration....but in the end...they are all A.australis :-).... Just a tip.....remove those exuvia the minute you see them....organisms like mites are still in the exuvium after shedding and when you remove it...you get rid of them..instead of mites that are able to crawl back to the scorpion...
  7. I agree with Isaac, it seems an immature of H.hottentotta.
  8. Czech scorpiologist Frantisek Kovarik recently published a new book. See info below. Illustrated Catalog of Scorpions, Part II. Bothriuridae; Chaerilidae; Buthidae I., genera Compsobuthus, Hottentotta, Isometrus, Lychas and Sassanidotus Dear colleagues, A. A. Ojanguren Affilastro and I are pleased to inform you that the book has just been published. It is in English and contains 332 species including 143 synonyms of which 19 are new (total of 475 taxa). Described are eight new species of the family Buthidae. The volume has 400 pages in A4 format, is hard-bound, and contains 1621 color photos of specimens in their habitats, during mating and parental care, morphology of conserved specimens, and of localities. Also included are 253 black-and-white photos, 110 drawings, and 26 distribution maps. More information on the book can be obtained at www.kovarex.com/scorpio, where 14 selected pages give an idea about the internal arrangement and appearance of the publication. We hope you find the book interesting and decide to obtain it or ask your institution to do so. We would also be grateful to you for informing colleagues about this new title and/or placing this information on your web pages, because the book is not offered by any commercial network and can be ordered only from the first author at kovarik.scorpio@gmail.com. The price is 120 euros (150 USD), which includes postage. Special offer: It is possible to purchase both volumes, Part I (published in 2009, price 80 euros) and Part II of the Illustrated Catalog at a discounted price of 170 euros or 212 USD. www.kovarex.com/scorpio Cheers, Michiel
  9. The pic was removed??
  10. Welcome to the VL!
  11. No, I don't have any experience with this genus....You could post the same question on www.skorpione.de Verstuurd van mijn GT-I9195 met Tapatalk
  12. :D Verstuurd van mijn GT-I9195 met Tapatalk
  13. Verstuurd van mijn GT-I9195 met Tapatalk
  14. Gromgrom is right, you can sex them at a very young age. Actually the proper term is "a modified basal middle lammelae".... Verstuurd van mijn GT-I9195 met Tapatalk
  15. Well, I had never heard of the nectar so I had to google it:D The plants are too young I guess and me being unfamiliar with the extraction process, I'd rather save the plants and buy the stuff.... Peppers are cool,which ones do you grow...I only have some herbs, black berries,raspberries and a peartree in my garden...My kids always reek havoc on the plants......despite countless warning it is just too tempting to pluck unripe stuff:D Verstuurd van mijn GT-I9195 met Tapatalk